Good Reads: Dollar signs, technology, and government secrets

This post is part of a series recommending longform, narrative nonfiction (as well as other worthwhile writings). The Secret Lives of Tumblr Teens by Elspeth Reeve, The New Republic The subtitle to this story sums it up best: “That feeling when you hit a million followers, make more money than your mom, push a diet pill scheme, loseContinue reading “Good Reads: Dollar signs, technology, and government secrets”

Good Reads: Pieces from 2015 that are still worth your time

This post is part of a series recommending longform, narrative nonfiction (as well as other worthwhile writings). I know it’s already February and there are plenty of pieces with a 2016 timestamp to read and recommend, but here are a few pieces I read toward the end of last year that are each significant or touching in theirContinue reading “Good Reads: Pieces from 2015 that are still worth your time”

Good Reads: Life and the giants we face

This post is part of a series recommending longform, narrative nonfiction (as well as other worthwhile writings). No two people live identical lives. No two people face all of the same hardships and challenges. Every life has its own giants. Each story recommended below is about an individual (or individuals) who face or avoid their giants in uniqueContinue reading “Good Reads: Life and the giants we face”

Motivational quotes, because writing is hard

My sophomore year of college, I started keeping a journal dedicated entirely to writing and all the pain and frustration that comes with it. Today, I share with you motivational quotes from its pages. Read, contemplate, and then get to work! Just as aliens abduct only people who believe in alien abductions, writers block strikes onlyContinue reading “Motivational quotes, because writing is hard”

Good Reads: Read this after watching Wall-E and you’ll think twice about buying the next iPhone

Philosophers of story spend a lot of energy trying to nail down the purpose of storytelling. We know that people connect through stories, we know that stories mean more than statistics, we know that those who read a lot of stories tend to be more empathetic and gracious, but why do we tell stories in the first place?

The Power of Narrative: A recap

Two weeks ago, I attended The Power of Narrative at Boston University, a conference focused on narrative nonfiction. The night before, I noted the sessions I wanted to attend and wrote out objectives. Following are my objectives and the related things I learned while I was there. 1. Make connections I didn’t talk to that manyContinue reading “The Power of Narrative: A recap”

Good Reads: Bionic achievements, hitchhiking moms, and rapping Christians

This is part of a semi-weekly series recommending interesting and well-written longform/narrative nonfiction articles. This week’s picks: The Dream Kickoff by Danielle Elliot, Grantland Paralyzed. Not forever but long enough for walking to seem an eternal impossibility. Enter Miguel Nicolelis, a Brazilian neuroscientist with a passion to bring the paralyzed to their feet using an exoskeleton controlledContinue reading “Good Reads: Bionic achievements, hitchhiking moms, and rapping Christians”

What is art anyway?

I have a fear. A gripping fear that I think about late at night when I realize another day has gone by and the only words I’ve pieced together were about someone else’s work. When I curl up in bed, ready to fall asleep so tomorrow will come, but not ready because it means todayContinue reading “What is art anyway?”

Good Reads: Investigating cults, drug mules, and Martin Luther King

This is the fifth in a new series of weekly posts recommending well-written narrative nonfiction/longform articles. The Man Who Saves You from Yourself: Going undercover with a cult infiltrator by Nathaniel Rich, Harper’s David Sullivan, a private investigator in LA who specialized in cults, passed away last October, shortly before this article was published. The piece tells the story ofContinue reading “Good Reads: Investigating cults, drug mules, and Martin Luther King”

Good Reads: Missing hikers, recovering communities, and war dogs

This is the fourth in a new series of weekly posts recommending well-written narrative nonfiction/longform articles. Did North Korea Kidnap an American Hiker? by Chris Vogel, Outside In 2004, David Sneddon, 24, was capping off a summer studying in China by hiking western China near the Tiger Leaping Gorge. The Mandarin-speaking American was excited to return to the States andContinue reading “Good Reads: Missing hikers, recovering communities, and war dogs”